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Academics from Tulane University in New Orleans took data from the UK Biobank and gave the anonymous participants a sleep score based on their inputted data.

People who regularly get a good night's sleep and are in a healthy nighttime routine are at a lower risk of heart failure than those who struggle to doze off. 

A study of more than 400,000 Britons has revealed adults with the best sleep patterns have a 42 per cent reduced risk of heart disease compared to those with an unhealthy relationship with sleep. 

The finding accounts for other factors such as age, genetics and the presence of conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity.  

A study of more than 400,000 Britons revealed adults with the best sleep patterns have a 42 per cent reduced risk of hear disease compared to those with an unhealthy relationship with sleep (stock)

A study of more than 400,000 Britons revealed adults with the best sleep patterns have a 42 per cent reduced risk of hear disease compared to those with an unhealthy relationship with sleep (stock)

Academics from Tulane University in New Orleans took data from the UK Biobank and gave the anonymous participants a 'sleep score' based on the data they submitted. 

This was compared with their history of heart health over ten years and the data revealed a trend between the two.  

A 'sleep score' is based on five behaviours: sleep duration, insomnia, snoring, whether they were early birds or night owls and if they suffered from daytime sleepiness.

The findings add to emerging evidence sleep problems may play a role in the development of heart failure.

Author Professor Lu Qi from Tulane University said: 'The healthy sleep score we created was based on the scoring of these five sleep behaviours.

'Our findings highlight the importance of improving overall sleep patterns to help prevent heart failure.'

Data analysis and questionnaires were used to examine the relationship between healthy sleep patterns and heart failure.

The researchers analysed data from 408,802 people who were 37 to 73-years-old when they were recruited between 2006 and 2010.

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: Daily Mail

 

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