Study Finds That Most Christians Keep God on Their Minds Throughout Their Day; Black Protestants Are Most Likely to Have Daily Prayer Times

About 2 in 3 Americans who regularly attend a Protestant church (67 percent) disagree with the statement: “Throughout many of my activities I don’t think about God,” with 40 percent strongly disagreeing.

Fewer (19 percent) agree or say they neither agree nor disagree (14 percent) in the survey, which was conducted Jan. 14–29.

“A Christian has the opportunity to walk with God,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. “Most churchgoers affirm their thoughts are on God as they go about life’s activities.”

Women are more likely than men (45 percent to 33 percent) to strongly assert they’re thinking about God throughout their day.

Middle-aged churchgoers are more likely to say they think about God during many of their activities. Those age 35 to 49 (42 percent) and 50 to 64 (46 percent) are more likely to strongly affirm their constant thoughts of God than those 18 to 34 (33 percent) and those 65 and older (36 percent).

African American (55 percent) and Hispanic churchgoers (51 percent) are more likely to strongly assert they regularly think about God during the day than white churchgoers (33 percent) or churchgoers of other ethnicities (32 percent).

Black Protestants (58 percent) are more likely than evangelical Protestants (40 percent) or mainline Protestants (27 percent) to strongly disagree they don’t think about God throughout many of their activities.

Those who attend worship services at least weekly (41 percent) are more likely than those who attend less frequently (36 percent) to strongly disagree.

Intentional momentsAbout 2 in 3 Americans who regularly attend a Protestant church (67 percent) disagree with the statement: “Throughout many of my activities I don’t think about God,” with 40 percent strongly disagreeing.

Fewer (19 percent) agree or say they neither agree nor disagree (14 percent) in the survey, which was conducted Jan. 14–29.

“A Christian has the opportunity to walk with God,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. “Most churchgoers affirm their thoughts are on God as they go about life’s activities.”

Women are more likely than men (45 percent to 33 percent) to strongly assert they’re thinking about God throughout their day.

Middle-aged churchgoers are more likely to say they think about God during many of their activities. Those age 35 to 49 (42 percent) and 50 to 64 (46 percent) are more likely to strongly affirm their constant thoughts of God than those 18 to 34 (33 percent) and those 65 and older (36 percent).

African American (55 percent) and Hispanic churchgoers (51 percent) are more likely to strongly assert they regularly think about God during the day than white churchgoers (33 percent) or churchgoers of other ethnicities (32 percent).

Black Protestants (58 percent) are more likely than evangelical Protestants (40 percent) or mainline Protestants (27 percent) to strongly disagree they don’t think about God throughout many of their activities.

Those who attend worship services at least weekly (41 percent) are more likely than those who attend less frequently (36 percent) to strongly disagree.

Intentional moments

About 2 in 3 Americans who regularly attend a Protestant church (67 percent) disagree with the statement: “Throughout many of my activities I don’t think about God,” with 40 percent strongly disagreeing.

Fewer (19 percent) agree or say they neither agree nor disagree (14 percent) in the survey, which was conducted Jan. 14–29.

“A Christian has the opportunity to walk with God,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. “Most churchgoers affirm their thoughts are on God as they go about life’s activities.”

Women are more likely than men (45 percent to 33 percent) to strongly assert they’re thinking about God throughout their day.

Middle-aged churchgoers are more likely to say they think about God during many of their activities. Those age 35 to 49 (42 percent) and 50 to 64 (46 percent) are more likely to strongly affirm their constant thoughts of God than those 18 to 34 (33 percent) and those 65 and older (36 percent).

African American (55 percent) and Hispanic churchgoers (51 percent) are more likely to strongly assert they regularly think about God during the day than white churchgoers (33 percent) or churchgoers of other ethnicities (32 percent).

Black Protestants (58 percent) are more likely than evangelical Protestants (40 percent) or mainline Protestants (27 percent) to strongly disagree they don’t think about God throughout many of their activities.

Those who attend worship services at least weekly (41 percent) are more likely than those who attend less frequently (36 percent) to strongly disagree.

Intentional moments

Around 2 in 5 churchgoers (38 percent) say they set aside time for private worship, praise or thanksgiving to God every day.

Another 29 percent say they do so a few times a week, while 13 percent set aside the time once a week, 7 percent a few times a month, 4 percent once a month, and 9 percent rarely or never.

“Having an attitude of praise requires noticing who God is and what He is doing. This takes intentionality,” McConnell said. “Once we choose to observe His work, however, the thanks and worship come naturally.”

Female churchgoers (40 percent) are more likely than their male counterparts (36 percent) to say they set aside those moments every day.

African Americans (45 percent) and Hispanics (43 percent) are also more likely than whites (36 percent) or other ethnicities (31 percent) to have specific times for private worship, praise or thanksgiving every day.

Black Protestants (46 percent) and evangelical Protestants (40 percent) are more likely than mainline Protestants (29 percent) to say they have such times daily.

Those who attend church at least weekly (40 percent) are more likely than those who attend less frequently (33 percent) to have set aside times for private worship every day.

Click here to read more.
Source: Baptist Press

Views: 11

Comment

You need to be a member of The Oracle to add comments!

Join The Oracle

The Oracle Magazine is a Hip-Hop magazine and Social Community with industry news, music, videos, photos, Health Tips,discussions and more!

Please Contact Us At

                  Call or Text: 424-644-9089
             Email: Theoraclemag@gmail.com

Daily Devotional

Latest Activity

Prince Malachi The First's 3 blog posts were featured
8 hours ago
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
8 hours ago
Prince Malachi The First's 6 blog posts were featured
yesterday
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
yesterday
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Wednesday
Prince Malachi The First's 8 blog posts were featured
Wednesday
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Tuesday
Prince Malachi The First's 3 blog posts were featured
Tuesday
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Monday
Prince Malachi The First's 4 blog posts were featured
Sunday
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Feb 16
Prince Malachi The First's video was featured

Ty Brasel - "The Power" feat. KB (Official Music Video) #CHH #ChristianHipHop #ChristianRap #gospelrap #holyhiphop #hiphop

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
Feb 16
Prince Malachi The First posted a video

Ty Brasel - "The Power" feat. KB (Official Music Video)

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
Feb 16
Prince Malachi The First's 3 blog posts were featured
Feb 15
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Feb 14
Prince Malachi The First's 7 blog posts were featured
Feb 14
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Feb 13
Prince Malachi The First's 7 blog posts were featured
Feb 13
Prince Malachi The First posted blog posts
Feb 12
Prince Malachi The First's 6 blog posts were featured
Feb 11

Look for THE ORACLE On Facebook and Twitter!

Birthdays

There are no birthdays today

Events

© 2020   Created by Prince Malachi The First.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service